California workers may be facing increased dangers on the job, according to the state agency in charge of occupational safety issues. Every year, Cal/OSHA releases statistics and an analysis of workplace injuries during the past year, based on the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries. These results often focus on deadly accidents, but they often point to trends where many more workers are suffering from catastrophic injuries. This information is used to set priorities within the agency to reduce workplace dangers in the future.

Workplace fatalities on the rise

In 2017, 376 workers were killed in California, a number that jumped to 422 in 2018. Cal/OSHA officials viewed the rise as a serious concern, but it also points to the risks that many workers face. You may have suffered non-fatal but catastrophic harm in an on-the-job accident, from losing a limb to losing your ability to work at a high-paying skilled trade job. Despite the expression of concern, Cal/OSHA did not announce plans to step up enforcement efforts.

Motor vehicle accidents a major threat

According to statistics, 43% of California workers killed on the job in 2018 were Latino, which could indicate that proper training information is not being conveyed to workers with less English knowledge. In addition, over one-third of all workers killed died in transportation incidents. Some of these accidents may have involved reckless drivers, while others could have been caused by poorly maintained equipment provided by the employers. There were 69 people killed on the job in transportation accidents in 2018, while many more were severely injured.

The consequences of a serious workplace injury can linger on for a long time to come, costing workers thousands of dollars in lost wages and medical bills. A lawyer may help you to protect your rights and pursue the compensation you deserve.