Many drivers in California and across the U.S. are ambivalent when it comes to self-driving cars. AAA conducted a survey in January 2020 that shows just what the majority of U.S. adults think about self-driving technology. First of all, only 12% of the respondents said they would feel safe in a self-driving car. Twenty-eight percent even said that they are unsure what to think about the tech.

Automakers, in particular, need to consider the following survey results as they can be better equipped to address drivers’ misgivings. Fifty-seven percent of respondents said they want to know who would be held legally responsible for any crashes that involve self-driving cars while 51% asked what laws might be introduced to make these vehicles safe. A little less than half expressed their concern about self-driving cars being hacked.

Respondents also give their opinion as to what would make them feel safer in a self-driving vehicle. Seventy-two percent said they would feel safer if they had the ability to take over such a vehicle in the event that something goes wrong. Sixty-nine percent said they would like for these cars to have a human back-up driver. Lastly, 42% said they want to see or be a part of a demonstration involving a self-driving car prior actually getting into one.

While it remains to be seen how one can pursue a personal injury case when the accident involved a self-driving car, there are complications enough when it comes to semi-autonomous vehicles. Those who were injured because a driver became distracted through the use of driver assistance features like adaptive cruise control may want to consult an attorney. If their case holds up to California’s negligence laws, then the lawyer may build the case up with the help of crash investigators and strive for a fair settlement.