On-the-job injuries can happen in many different types of workplaces in California. Many of these accidents must be recorded, according to Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations. Specifically, employers have to report any serious injury, including those that require time away from work, those that lead to restricted work or those that require medical treatment that goes beyond first aid. In addition, injuries that require transferring a worker to another position must be reported. OSHA provides Form 300 to employers to keep track of these types of incidents.

Recording and reporting workplace injuries is an employer’s responsibility, and those that fail to do so could face serious penalties. While injuries can occur even in safe workplaces, some employers may attempt to avoid inspections and other forms of scrutiny by failing to truthfully report the incidence of workplace accidents. These types of injuries must be reported even if they involve seasonal or temporary workers or those who are working at home at the time. However, the injury must be work-related, connected to activity serving the interests of the employer, rather than caused by unrelated circumstances in the employee’s home or due to a medical condition.

In almost all cases, injuries sustained during work hours on the job are considered work-related and must be reported to OSHA. In addition, some types of workplace injuries can accumulate over time until they become recordable under safety regulations. For example, employees may work for years at poorly designed workstations that lead to joint pain and other damage requiring substantial and costly medical treatment.

Some employers may attempt to avoid responsibility for on-the-job injuries, especially when multiple companies are involved at one worksite. A workers’ compensation lawyer may help an injured employee pursue the benefits they deserve.