Chances are that you have automatic emergency braking and forward-collision warning, or AEB and FCW, in your vehicle. These are supposed to become standard on all new vehicles by 2022, but there is no nationwide mandate that truck fleets incorporate them. Perhaps you were injured by a truck driver in California and realized that AEB and FCW could have prevented the driver from causing the crash.

Reducing rear-end collisions with AEB

It’s good to know just how these features can prevent crashes. One truck fleet in Arkansas, put AEB and FCW in 98% of its semi-trucks and saw a 50% drop in rear-end collisions caused by its employees. Another company in Wisconsin experienced a 68% reduction in these crashes as well as a 95% reduction in crash severity within three years of incorporating the safety features.

Mitigating crash severity is an important aspect of AEB and FCW. What could have been fatal accidents may end with only injuries, and what could have been injury crashes could result only in property damage. The results can range from higher driver retention rates to shorter equipment downtime.

No plans to make AEB mandatory

The last time that truck safety regulators mandated the use of safety features was in 2017 when the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration made electronic stability control a requirement. Somewhere from 45% to 50% of newly sold heavy-duty vehicles come with AEB and FCW, but this is entirely through the choice of individual trucking fleets.

On Aug. 5, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration held a Truck Safety Summit to discuss the advantages of AEB and FCW. Many groups hope that the FMCSA will consider pushing for these systems on all trucks.

For the victims of trucker negligence

Even with automatic emergency braking and other devices, truckers can cause crashes through negligence, such as by driving drunk or drowsy. Assuming you were the victim of negligence, you may have a personal injury case on your hands. You may find out how much you’re eligible for in compensatory damages by seeing a lawyer for a case evaluation.